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Employer Law Blog

We address issues, cases and matters of statutory and regulatory compliance of employment law that can impact a business' growth and profitability.

Employer Law Blog
June 17, 2021

Employer’s Beware: The Supreme Court Narrowly Interprets Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

In Van Buren v. United States, the Supreme Court handed down its first major decision construing the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. In general, the CFAA sets criminal and civil penalties for unauthorized access to a computer. The CFAA identifies two ways of violating the statute, "access without authorization" and "exceed[ing] authorized access". 

Employer Law Blog
February 2, 2017

A Primer on the New Missouri Right to Work Law

What does Right to Work Mean? Employers are barred from: requiring employees to become, remain, or refrain from becoming a member of a labor organization; or pay dues or other charges required of labor organization members as a condition of employment. Any agreement, understanding, or practice, written or oral, implied or expressed, between any labor organization and employer that violates the rights of employees as guaranteed under Act is unlawful, null and void, and of no legal effect.

Employer Law Blog
November 14, 2016

EMPLOYER ALERT: It May Soon Be Illegal to Ask Potential Employees to Disclose Their Previous Salary

On August 1, 2016, Massachusetts became the first state to bar employers from asking about an applicant’s salary before offering them a job. Bill S.2119, which goes into effect January 1, 2018, states that it shall be an unlawful practice for an employer to seek the wage or salary history of a prospective employee from the prospective employee or a current or former employer. The law does not prohibit prospective employees from voluntarily disclosing such information. Further, an employer may seek or confirm a prospective employee’s wage or salary history after an offer of employment with compensation has been negotiated.