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Employer Law Blog

We address issues, cases and matters of statutory and regulatory compliance of employment law that can impact a business' growth and profitability.

Employer Law Blog
December 30, 2016

Missouri Legislative Update – Is the Tide Finally Turning?

The Republican controlled General Assembly is getting a head start on the labor and employment front by pre-filing several pro-business labor and employment bills. Right to work- In general, the various bills in one form or another make contract clauses that require union membership as a condition of employment or continued employment null and void. Most of the bills do NOT apply retroactive. Accordingly, all present union security clauses in current collective bargaining agreements would remain in full force and effect. The “right to work” bills include Missouri House Bills 91, 42, and 131; and Missouri Senate Bills 19 and 21.

Employer Law Blog
October 13, 2016

READY FOR 12/1? Take the Exemption Tests

The Department of Labor’s Final Rule on white collar exemptions takes effect on December 1, 2016. Are you ready? You can answer this question with three simple tests. An employee must pass all three tests to be eligible for exemption from overtime pay.  1. The Salary Basis Test First, the exempt employee must be paid on a salary basis rather than an hourly basis. The salary must not be subject to reduction based on quality or quantity of work. 2. The Salary Level Test Second, the employee’s salary must meet the minimum salary lever. Currently, the minimum salary level is $455 per week, which is $23,660 per year. On December 1, that minimum salary level will increase to $913 per week, which is $47,476 per year.

Employer Law Blog
May 18, 2016

DOL Regulations: New Exempt Employee Salary Thresholds Are Here Now

Last year, the Department of Labor published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking signaling a drastic impending change to the salary threshold requirement for employers to classify certain jobs as exempt from overtime and minimum wage. Since that time, we have been working with clients on workforce analysis and planning, including budget forecasting, to determine the best and most cost-efficient way to adapt to the changes to come.

Employer Law Blog
October 15, 2015

Court Strikes Down St. Louis Ordinance to Increase Minimum Wage

On August 28, 2015, St. Louis Mayor Slay signed a bill, approved by the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, into law as Ordinance 70078 that would have raised the minimum wage in St. Louis City from the current rate of $7.65 per hour. Ordinance 70078 was set to increase the current minimum wage to $8.25 per hour on October 15, 2015, with additional increases taking place on a yearly basis - $9.00 on January 1, 2016, $10.00 in 2017, and $11.00 on January 1, 2018. In 2019 the ordinance provided for increases to the minimum wage based on the rate of inflation. The ordinance states its purpose was “for the preservation of public peace, health and safety.” It expressly identified the intent to address local concerns for the health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the City of St. Louis.