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The CDC has Reduced the Recommended Duration of Quarantine Periods for Casual COVID-19 Exposures

As we enter our ninth month of the pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has reduced the recommended duration of quarantine periods for casual COVID-19 exposures, from 14 days to 7-10 days. 

As we enter our ninth month of the pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has reduced the recommended duration of quarantine periods for casual COVID-19 exposures, from 14 days to 7-10 days. The CDC now recommends that an exposed person should quarantine for 10 days if s/he has not taken a test, so long as s/he has no symptoms. Further, an exposed person should quarantine for 7 days following a negative test result, if no symptoms are present.  Quarantine beyond 10 days where the individual has no symptoms has little additional transmission risk, the CDC determined. The CDC also opined that compliance with a 7-10 day quarantine is more achievable than a 14 day period, and may help local health departments in their tracing efforts. These recommendations will hopefully allow employers to return their workforce safely, sooner, after exposure. For additional guidance on compliance with the CDC’s recommendations and how they affect business operations, please contact a member of the Labor and Employment Team.

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